Category Archives: Driving Tips

The Pollution Under Control (PUC) Certificate

Every driver needs to carry legal documents for their vehicle: an original driving license, insurance, Registration Certificate and a PUC Certificate.

What is a Vehicle Pollution Certificate (PUC)?
A Pollution Under Control Certificate is provided to vehicles after they take the Pollution Under Control test. It is an official approval that emissions from the vehicle is under pollution norms. The certificate is proof that the vehicle follows the pollution standards set by the government.

It is mandatory for all vehicles operational on Indian roads to carry a legitimate PUC certificate.

The PUC certificate must specify:

  • The certificate serial number, to monitor when was the last test taken by your vehicle
  • The vehicle license plate number
  • The date of the PUC test
  • The certificates expiry date
  • The PUC emissions test readings

What is the Procedure, Cost and Validity of a PUC Certificate?

  • A PUC Certificate is issued with a new vehicle; with the validity of the certificate for a new car and bike being 1 year
  • The validity of a renewed certificate is 6 months for both cars and bikes

Vehicle owners can get the emission test and the PUC certificate at any of the following places:

  • At a petrol bunk that is authorised to carry out the emission tests and have trained employees for PUC testing
  • At service centres that are authorised to carry out emission tests

Costs & Penalties:
The cost to obtain the PUC Certificate varies from Rs.60 to Rs.100, as well as on the fuel type. While the fine for not carrying a PUC certificate is Rs.1000 for the first time offence and Rs.2000 for a repeated offence.

Pollution-free-for-Blog

Safety Tips When Driving in the Hills

Travelling to the hills and driving there can be just as thrilling as it can be dangerous. There can be blind curves and hairpin bends and the driver needs to know how to navigate these. There are some necessary cautions and hill driving etiquette that need to be followed at all times.

Here are some tips to follow while driving in hilly regions:

Go Slow:
Do not exceed the approved speed limit while driving to any Hill Station. Watch out for the road signs that instruct you on the ideal speed for the location you are in. Speeding is dangerous on mountain roads and not the place you’d want to test out how fast your car can go. Gravity will work against you whether you are driving up or downhill. Slow down on all curves and descend at the same speed that you used while going up, and drive below the speed limit on curves.

Overtaking:
Overtaking is a risk even on the plains but tenfold on mountain roads. If you must overtake, always check traffic signs for bends, if the road is wide enough, and watch the vehicle in front of you for any signs of change in speed or swerving. When going uphill remember the traffic against you is moving faster coming downhill. Be smart in your judgement before you attempt it.

Know the types of roads:
Before you start your trip, do research on the type of road you will be driving on. Whether it is a typical narrow hilly drive or a well laid dual carriageway. Roads could vary from a good 4 or 6 or even 8 lane expressway to an off-beaten, bumpy path, it is always safer to be mentally prepared for different kinds of roads that are in the area you are travelling to.

Know your driving skills:
You should know just how much your car can take. Does it have the power to climb those steep roads? Will it carry a full load? You should also know how to handle your car to get the best out of it on those uphill pulls. The steeper the road, the more you will have to use lower gears to climb them, as well as lower gears together with accurate braking techniques while descending. Be vigilant about your tyres, your braking and your steering, especially on wet/damp roads.

No matter how much you want to, it’s never a good idea to try out those Fast and Furious drifting manoeuvres you’ve seen in the films. As adventurous as you feel, safety is still the priority.

Safety Tips for Driving at Night

The dangers of driving are always exaggerated after dark. It takes more caution and alertness to drive during the night than it does when driving in daylight. Especially in a country like India where drivers are just a little more ‘slack’ about following road rules.

Drowsy Driving:
Never drive if you are feeling extra fatigued at the end of the day. Always be cautious that there could be other drowsy drivers on the road. Long work hours, extra work shifts, lack of quality sleep, and sleep disorders are only a few of the reasons why accidents happen because of inattentive and overtired drivers.

Blinding Lights:
We have all experienced those blinding high-beam headlights in our face obscuring our view momentarily. But all it takes are those few blinding seconds to cause a serious accident. Only use your high-beam lights when necessary; when visibility is low. Try to switch between low and high beams when you see oncoming drivers. Just because they blind you doesn’t mean you need to blind them as well.

Don’t Stare at Oncoming Lights:
Those High-beam headlights can be extremely distracting; the best strategy is not to stare directly at them and to do your best to cast your gaze down when cars are coming at you. Try to focus on the white line. This will prevent you from being temporarily blinded.

Despite popular belief, don’t buy those yellow-tint sunglasses that would supposedly help you see better at night. They limit the amount of light that passes through them, making distinguishing objects and road hazards more difficult.

Don’t Drink and Drive:
Alcohol is the most common cause of accidents, even more so at night time. Be wary of other drivers when driving at night as you are more likely to encounter a driver who is under the influence of alcohol. Remember, you not only have your own life in your hands when driving but of those around you as well; so never drink and drive no matter how “little” you think you had, that is still too much.

Clean Your Windshield:
Your windshield might look fine during the day, but it can cause glare when headlights hit it. Dust that might not bother you during the day can be spotty and distracting at night, so it’s important to clean your windshield both inside and out. This applies to motorists’ helmet visors as well.

Unique Parking Garages in the World

We’ve all had to endure the painstaking process of driving through the lanes, winding around those sharp corners and squeezing into tight spaces as we search for an empty parking spot. In a country like India that has an ever-growing population where malls and shopping locations are always crowded – and admittedly people don’t always park according to the guidelines – finding an empty parking spot can be an arduous task. If only someone could come up with a design like these unique parking garages built across the world.

Autostadt Car Towers
The Autostadt Car Towers have made it into the 2014 BOOK OF GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS™ with vehicle transport technology that has been recognized as the “ world’s fastest automatic parking system in the world” in the category “extraordinary elevators”. With a record speed of two metres per second, new vehicles are transported – in one minute and 44 seconds from the entrance of the towers to the highest parking space. This makes the fully automated high-rise parking system the fastest in the world.

Marina City
Completed in 1964, these twin towers were well ahead of their time. Marina City was originally designed by Bertrand Goldberg to be a small town square in the heart of the city. The upper half of Marina City is home to 450 different apartments and offices while the lower half is dedicated to parking, with 896 parking spaces per building.

Umihotaru
Built on a 650m manmade island (Kisarazu artificial island) surrounded by 360º of water in the middle of the Tokyo Bay Aqualine, Umihotaru is a bridge/tunnel combination that connects the city of Kawasaki with the city of Kisarazu across the Tokyo Bay. The unique and unusual “Umihotaru Parking Area” is designed in the shape of a cruise liner, stands five levels tall, with parking on levels 1 through 3, and commercial facilities on levels 4 and 5. This is the only shopping mall on the sea where you can enjoy panoramic 360º views of Tokyo Bay, as well as many shops, restaurants and services.

Eureka Car Park
Inspired by the work of Swiss artist Felice Varini – who is well-known for his giant vector art superimposed on buildings, this cavernous concrete car park beneath Melbourne’s Eureka Tower used a 3-D chalk drawing technique to transform regular directions into visual puzzles. The design team painted keywords and directions directly onto the garage walls and floors. The words “In,” “Out,” “Up, ” and “Down” snap into alignment to convey information at key decision-making points along the way; with colour codes such as Red = out, Green = in, blue = up and yellow = down.

Robotic Parking Garage
This parking garage in Dubai is currently the world’s largest robotic parking garage and can handle 250 cars per hour with a 765-vehicle storage facility. Robotic Parking Systems can reduce the land area used for parking by 50% as compared to traditional ramp style parking. The robotic automation ensures that the cars are parked as efficiently as possible. It is the first automated parking garage in the Middle East region.

Herma Parking Building
Looking more like a museum or gallery the luxurious façade holds an unconventionally chic parking garage. Herma Parking Building is located in the subcentre of Yongin City and is designed to feature precision openings spread out across the building. The 853-sq-m structure is covered with five layers of over 635 polycarbonate panels and 930 stainless steel pieces.