Category Archives: Mileage

Car Safety Checklist for Holiday Trips

When preparing for long road trips, it is always wise to make a complete checklist before you start, as you can never know when your car will break down.

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A good tip is to store an emergency vehicle kit fully equipped at all times in your car. A few must-haves include:

  1. First Aid Kit
  2. Reflective triangle
  3. A jack
  4. Flashlight with extra batteries
  5. Jumpstart kit
  6. Tyre inflator kit
  7. Extra fuel

Always get your car thoroughly checked and be ready for any emergencies. Remember, when in doubt, just follow the car manual.

GUIDE TO BUYING A USED MOTORCYCLE

Two-wheelers play a vital role in how people travel in India as it is a better and easier way to navigate through the endless traffic. With this surge of bike availability, manufacturers continue to provide endless options for anyone who wants to purchase a bike. However, if you don’t want to spend all that money on a new bike, there is always the practical option of getting one secondhand.

There are a few necessities to keep in mind when looking at a secondhand option. First things first, where do you buy one? From a reputed dealer. Getting a bike from a dealer will increase your chances of getting a machine that is already thoroughly checked. You might also consider getting one directly from a private seller. You can opt for this type of purchase if you know the seller, or know what to look for.

Inspect the bike:
If you have the choice, take someone along who has already has a bike and has experience with them. Examine the bike cold; it’s really easy to hide starting and running problems on a hot bike. Examine bar ends, levers, and footpegs and other additional damage such as tweaked handlebars. Remember, every small damage can add to the cost of fixing the bike.

Brakes and Tyres: Check the brake pads, the colour and level of the brake fluid and the tyre tread. The treads should not have uneven wear or damage. Brake fluid should be clear and light in colour, like a nice pale yellow, depending on the brand.

Oil and Rust: Check the oil level and for any spillage, especially around the engine. Look for rusty chains and even a rusty fuel tank. Pay close attention to deeper rust; surface rust isn’t a cause for concern, but deep rust could show that the bike wasn’t maintained.

Chains and Chassis: Check the condition of chain and sprocket and for visible deep scratches. Rotate the rear wheel and check if the sound of the chain is uniform, as it should be.

Electricals, wheels, suspension and exhaust:
Thoroughly check that there are no oil leaks around the suspension and the exhaust pipe. Check for cracks in the wheels and make sure the spokes aren’t rusting.

Paperwork:
Last but not least, ensure you have all the necessary paperwork: the RC book, PUC, insurance, a NOC if the registration of a vehicle is going to be transferred from one RTO to another, the manual and the owner’s service records.

Rebuilding brakes, replacing chains and such is not uncommon in a used bike. While it might be a good investment to save some money, take your time in test riding the bike, choosing a good seller and deciding if it is the right choice for you.

Hybrid Cars

What is a hybrid car?
Hybrid cars are electrified vehicles that still use an internal combustion engine, which means combining a petrol or diesel engine with an electric motor. The main advantage of a hybrid is that it consumes less fuel and emits less CO2 than a conventional petrol or diesel-engine vehicle.

How do hybrid cars work?
Driving a hybrid is similar to driving an automatic car, so there’s little compromise on performance. A hybrid combines at least one electric motor with a gasoline engine to move the car, and its system recaptures energy via regenerative braking. Unlike an Electric Vehicle (EV) or Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV), hybrids also have a petrol or diesel engine to fall back on if the electricity supply is diminishing.

Types of hybrids:
There are three different types of hybrids and each work in a different way.

Parallel/Full Hybrid
This is the most common type of hybrid. A full hybrid is a car which can drive under its own electric power, petrol or a combination of both. They are sometimes called ‘parallel hybrids’. The car’s wheels can be powered in three different ways: either directly by the engine, by the electric motor alone, or a blend of the two power sources. The Toyota Prius is the most widely known example.

Mild Hybrid
A mild hybrid car cannot drive under electric power alone and doesn’t improve fuel economy to the extent that a full hybrid system can. The engine never drives the car; it only produces energy for the electric motor. The Honda Jazz r is one of the more popular examples.

Plug-in Hybrid
As its name states, this type of hybrid can be plugged into an electric outlet to recharge their batteries, as well as being charged on the move. It carries a much larger battery pack that must be fully recharged using an external electricity source from the home or public charging station. Popular plug-in hybrids include the BMW i8 and VW Golf GTE, with both cars having bigger battery capacities to enable a longer electric range.

Going Electric: Vehicles that are worth making the move

India has set a target of electric vehicles making up 30% of new sales of cars and two-wheelers by 2030. But the recent economic slowdown appears to have taken a toll on the electric vehicle plans. But the potential market is still huge, with India being the world’s biggest market for scooters and motorcycles; the next biggest market being China.

With the ever-growing pollution and bad air quality – and not to mention the continuous rise in fuel prices, more and more citizens are thinking about making the move to electric vehicles as they realize that going electric brings with it significant benefits; lower running costs, lower maintenance costs and pollution-free driving.

With manufacturers like Japan’s Suzuki Motors planning to launch an electric scooter in India by 2020, and Indian motorcycle makers Bajaj Motor and TVS Motor are also eyeing electric models, here are some existing models that are popular with consumers.

Okinawa i Praise
The scooter comes with a detachable lithium-ion battery that, according to the company, takes 2-3 hours to charge and gives a range of 160-180km. It is also equipped with features like geo-tagging, GPS, find my scooter, battery health and vehicle status, all of which can be accessed via an app on your Android smartphone.

Colours: Glossy Silver Black, Glossy Golden Black, Red Black

Revolt RV400
The Revolt RV400 is India’s first AI enabled motorcycle. It’s battery charges from 0-100% in 4.5 hours. In an all-new innovation, Revolt also offers four sounds in the motorcycle, all controlled through the MyRevolt App.

Colours: Rebel Red, Cosmic Black
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Ather 450
A Bangalore based startup, Ather Energy launched the Ather 450 electric scooter which promises an acceleration of 0 to 40 kmph in just 3.9 seconds, a top speed of 80 kmph and a range of 55-75 km. According to the company, the 450 was designed from scratch to offer an exhilarating ride and a hassle-free ownership experience. The electric scooter promises some great unique features like a low centre of gravity, mono-shock suspension, front & rear disc brakes and perfect balance and a reverse mode.

Colours: White

ULTRAVIOLETTE F77
Sporting a bold design, the Ultraviolette launched the F77 in three colour variants. The bike is currently on sale only in Bengaluru while online registrations to purchase the motorcycle have opened. Deliveries are slated to commence in October 2020. The F77 is powered by a 25kW electric motor which produces 90Nm, making it the most powerful electric motorcycle currently on sale in India. Ultraviolette has DC fast-charging capability, giving it 50 minutes to charge up to 80% and 90 minutes for a full charge.

Colours: Airstrike, Shadow, Laser