Tag Archives: motorcycle

Beginner’s Guide to Buying a Helmet

Traffic laws or not, wearing a helmet when riding a motorcycle is an absolute necessity. Helmets cannot prevent an accident but it could be the deciding life or death factor in the case of a collision. But more often than not, riders tend to pick helmets based on looks and comfort over practicality and safety.

*Section 129 of the Motor Vehicles Act ’88 states that:
Every person riding on a motorcycle of any class or description should wear protective headgear.

Where headgear stands for:
a) By virtue of its shape, material and construction, could reasonably be expected to afford to the person driving or riding on a motorcycle a degree of protection from injury in the event of an accident; and
b) Is securely fastened to the head of the wearer by means of straps or other fastenings provided on the headgear.

When buying a helmet, there are always certain criteria that need to be looked into: the type of helmet, protection level and the correct fit.

A couple of things to take into consideration for the best helmet fit:
· If you wear spectacles, make sure the helmet sits comfortably on your head while wearing them
· The helmet’s inside lining should not be too snug and tight, pressing on your ears.
· Pick a helmet that suits the shape of your head

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Types of Helmets:
Not many people realize that the type of helmet they buy should depend upon the type of riding they’re going to do.

Full-face helmet:
Full-face helmets are the most recommended. The all-around head and chin coverage offers maximum protection making it the most popular and safest choice. They’re suitable for city commute as well as for high speeds. This helmet type also passes the aesthetic test in the looks department as it comes with unlimited designs, graphic elements and customization.

Flip-up Touring helmet:
Flip-up helmets are generally heavier due to their flip mechanism. Although it’s a variation of the full-face option, they are easier to put on and come with an integrated visor. This makes them a popular choice amongst travellers as they are a lot more comfortable for long distances.

Jet and Police Helmets:
Not the safest of choices, because they don’t offer as much protection as a full-face helmet with chin coverage. They are usually considerably lighter and airier in hot weather and are more suited to city commute; hence these helmets are not meant for high speeds.

Open-face or Skullcap helmet:
Unfortunately, due to our constant hot weather, a lot of commuters wear an open-face or skull helmet. A skullcap helmet may look comfortable and provide plenty of airflow on hot days, however, these are not recommended as they barely ensure any protection for the sides of your face.

Today’s market is filled with so many helmet choices, it’s easy to find one that checks all the right boxes for your safety, comfort and even looks. But the main point to remember is, while all helmets don’t provide complete safety, they do provide some level of safety; so, always wear a helmet!

Sources:
* http://diu.gov.in
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Bike’s dashboard icons lighting up? Find out why

For a very long time, only cars came with inbuilt warning lights on the dashboard. But lucky for us, these days motorbikes come equipped with emergency lights and options of analogue or LCDs.

Dashboard warning symbols are also designed in different colours to create awareness and convey information about the current state of the vehicle. Usually, blue and green lights inform the rider that a service is active or that the vehicle is functioning normally; while red and yellow lights indicate that there is a fault. When the red light is displayed, then it is necessary to take action.

What does it mean when they light up?

Ignition Light:
If the ignition light is lit up, it means that the engine has some problems with the electrical system, the battery needs to be replaced or it is failing to charge. Your bike would not start if there is a fault in the battery.

Engine Temperature Warning Light:
This sign indicates that the engine coolant level may be running low or there may be a leak in the coolant system. This occurs when the temperature has crossed the normal level and can damage your bike’s engine.

Oil Pressure Warning Light:
This symbol indicates low oil pressure. It lights up when there is a variation in the oil levels which can damage the engine. For your safety, switch off the bike engine once you notice it.

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Neutral Light:
This neutral light illuminates in green and indicates to the rider that the bike is in a neutral state. When switching gears, this green light will disappear.

Indicator Light:
The indicator light also illuminates in green colour. If you are turning left, the left directional arrow will flash, for the right, the right directional arrow will flash. In case of hazard warning, both lights are activated.

Full Beam Light:
The full-beam light indicates that your headlight is on at full beam. Put off your high beam when you notice another car coming towards you on the other side of the road. It’s better to avoid high beam in the daytime so that you can save your battery life.

Warning lights can prevent a lot of mishaps from happening and save you from unnecessary troubles. If proper action is taken at the right time, it can even save lives and keep you safe.

Bike Troubles? We’ve all got them

India has quickly become the world’s largest two-wheeler market. With its considerable population size, most of which own a two-wheeler. It is a common sight to see hundreds of motorcycles on the roads, rather than cars. We Indians have come to depend so much on our bikes, that our whole day gets messed up if our bike breaks down in any way. Unfortunately, using the vehicle as much as we do on a daily basis, there are bound to be some mechanical hiccups.

Things to keep an eye on:

Weak battery:
Almost all two-wheelers are equipped with an electric start and this starter is entirely dependent on the battery. Your bike’s battery should have sufficient power to turn on this motor, but it needs high voltage from the battery for ignition. Signs of a weak battery is evident if your self-starter, horn and headlights don’t work well or even not at all. Quick tip: you can try pulling the clutch lever first and check if it starts up.

Low fuel:
It may not happen often, but it does happen occasionally; when your fuel gauge is inaccurate. Although it might seem clichéd, it won’t hurt to shake your bike a little and listen closely for any splashing inside your fuel tank.

Clogged fuel:
Sometimes your fuel control valve can get clogged with rust and dirt. Just make sure that corrosion doesn’t build up that could also lead to leakages.

Neutral mode:
Some bike may be required to be put into neutral for it to start, rather than the clutch lever. Put your bike into neutral and try to start it up.

Check the tailpipe:
With the amount of travelling that we do on our bikes, there’s a good chance of your bike’s exhaust getting clogged; it’s always a good idea to check the exhaust if you have any pets or animals in the area.

Engine cut-off switch:
We often use the ignition key to turn off the bike instead of the engine cut-off switch, but yet try to crank that engine. This is quite a common mistake.

There is nothing more frustrating than having vehicle trouble when you need to go about your day as planned. Just remember to not panic and follow through with these common issues first.